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Behaviour

Our Approach to Good Behaviour

At St. John Vianney School & Children’s Centre two principles govern the conduct of all:

The freedom to be and to feel safe

The freedom to learn

We recognise that the gift of freedom given by God to all, brings with it arduous choices and grave responsibilities. Children must learn for themselves how the choices they make have consequences both good and ill. This social learning needs: time (not essentially as discrete lessons, rather taking the time when needed); tolerance (expecting many mistakes but always practising); explicit direction (a dialogical approach to the experience of learners); restorative justice (an opportunity to make amends).  And given time this brings about a growing realisation of the responsibility they have for all of their thoughts, words and actions. The acceptance of this responsibility is seen in mature and self-disciplined individuals.

We provide children with a framework of good behaviour in which they have space to learn self-dicipline by making mistakes in a safe and supportive environment. By encouraging children to reflect upon these mistakes we guide them to change their own behaviour for the better and offer space to put things right. For some this critical reflection is both new and challenging, but it is central to their moral formation and conscience. Although this can be a long and sometimes difficult process, we all persevere because the rewards are reaped in a caring, considerate and civil society.

All children, will experience the effects of behaviour, their own and others, both good and ill. With this experience they will recognise that all behaviour is a choice and these choices bring consequences. At St. John Vianney School & Children’s Centre good choices are reinforced by rewards, be they explicit or self-contained and wrong choices result in sanctions. This experiential social learning does not happen in a vacuum, but through the care, guidance and support of parents working in partnership with many other adults and practitioners. For a very small number of children, it is sometimes beneficial to suspend the rewards and sanctions system, replacing it with an individual behaviour plan, that helps the child improve their behaviour using small steps.

How children learn to be self-disciplined

A calm orderly environment is essential if children are to learn most effectively. It is our responsibility to provide that environment in order that children and practitioners can make the most use of learning time. Therefore, we spend time setting the ground rules, and asserting a code of discipline, listed below, that helps children to best avail themselves of the opportunities presented through the curriculum and extended activities.

Making the right choice

- Code of Discipline -

Safety

We expect our youngest children to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 5 years-of-age to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 8 years-of-age to. . .

Learning

We expect our youngest children to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 5 years-of-age to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 8 years-of-age to. . .

Dress

We expect our youngest children to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 5 years-of-age to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 8 years-of-age to . . .

Social

We expect our youngest children to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 5 years-of-age to . . .

In addition, we expect our children from 8 years-of-age to . . .

Over time, this helps all to learn to. . .

Be Christ to others in all we do and think and say 

 

Anti-bullying: our school pledge

We are determined to do everything we can to tackle bullying in all forms in our school, our community and wherever we encounter it.

We believe:

We will:

 

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